1-19 of 19 Search Results for

4150

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.matlhand.c0046160
EISBN: 978-1-62708-224-2
... Abstract A stepped drive axle (hardened and tempered resulfurized 4150 steel forging) used in a high-speed electric overhead crane (rated at 6800 kg, or 7 tons, and handling about 220 lifts/day with each lift averaging 3625 to 5440 kg, or 4 to 6 tons) broke after 15 months of service. Visual...
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 4150 steel plunger shaft that failed in service from fatigue fractures in two locations. (a) Fracture sites on the plunger shaft: fillet (arrow A) and machined notch (arrow B). Shaft end (arrow C) was deformed by peening, but did not fracture. (b) Fracture surface at arrow A showing More
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 4150 steel drive axle for an overhead-crane wheel that fractured from fatigue in service due to insufficient interference fit between the wheel and the axle. (a) Original design showing location of fracture. (b) Improved axle design that used a narrow shoulder at stress area to prevent More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.design.c0047100
EISBN: 978-1-62708-233-4
... Abstract Plunger shafts machined from 4150 steel bar stock were involved in a series of fatigue failures. The fractures consistently occurred at two locations on the shafts: the shaft fillet and either side of a machined notch. The material specification for the shafts required 41xx series...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001131
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... Fig. 1 Macrograph of longitudinal crack in bar. 1.5×. Fig. 2 Oxide is present on the fracture surface. 2% nital etch. 100×. Abstract Two 25 x 40 mm (1 x 1.5 in.) AISI 4150 hot-rolled steel bars that cracked during heat treatment were examined to determine whether the heat...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.matlhand.c0091092
EISBN: 978-1-62708-224-2
.... Recommendations included replacing all drive shafts with new designs that eliminated the sharp 90 deg chamfers in favor of a more liberal chamfer, which would reduce the stress concentration in these areas. Cranes Drive shafts Rotating-bending fatigue 4150 UNS G4150 Fatigue fracture A drive shaft...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003538
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... than the voids from MnS-matrix debonding) ( Fig. 13 ). Fig. 13 A dual-dimple size observed in a 4150 steel. Material was isothermally transformed at 190 °C (375 °F) and was not tempered. Tested as a Charpy V-notch specimen at 0 °C (30 °F). Source: Ref 30 There is also a particle size...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006775
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... carbide particles (resulting in smaller dimples than the voids from MnS-matrix debonding), as shown in Fig. 13 . Fig. 13 Dual-dimple size observed in 4150 alloy steel. Material was isothermally transformed at 190 °C (375 °F) and was not tempered. Tested as a Charpy V-notch specimen at 0 °C (32 °F...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0001814
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
..., white-etching nitride surface layer. Figure 27(a) shows an AISI 4150 alloy steel chuck jaw that broke due to the presence of such a detrimental surface layer. A section from a broken tooth of the chuck jaw is shown in Fig. 27(b) . The nitride layer is present as a grain-boundary film beneath...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003532
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006818
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... surface layer. Figure 27(a) shows an AISI 4150 alloy steel chuck jaw that broke due to the presence of such a detrimental surface layer. A section from a broken tooth of the chuck jaw is shown in Fig. 27(b) . The nitride layer is present as a grain-boundary film beneath the surface layer...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006765
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... in Fig. 17 , along with a directly-viewed micrograph of the same area. The specimen is from a nitride American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) 4150 chuck jaw that broke prematurely in service due to the presence of a heavy white-etching nitride layer at the surface. The replica clearly shows the surface...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006820
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... carbon steels, such as SAE 1018 or SAE 1020, while more challenging applications may use SAE 4120, 4320, 4620, 8620, or others. For flame and induction hardening and for nitriding, the most common alloys are SAE 4140, 4150, and 4340. The choice of alloys and heat treatments is always a trade-off...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003537
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006774
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006810
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003510
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
..., 1541, 4140, and 4150. If possible, it is often a good choice to replace the 4100 series with the 8600 series of steels ( Ref 24 ). “Dirty” steels, those containing greater than 0.05% S (such as 1141 and 1144), are more prone to cracking. One reason for this is the greater alloy segregation in dirty...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003544
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006779
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2