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17-4 PH

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Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.mech.c9001727
EISBN: 978-1-62708-225-9
... effect of galvanic coupling, hydrogen embrittlement. Bolts Galvanic corrosion Spacecraft 17-4 PH UNS S17400 Hydrogen damage and embrittlement Fig. 1 Success of the mission depends greatly on the reliability of high-strength stainless steel fasteners. Analysis of service failures...
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 3 The relationship between hardness and toughness of 17-4 PH is almost linear. More
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Published: 01 June 2019
Fig. 1 Power plant gate-valve stem of 17-4 PH stainless that failed by SCC in high-purity water. (a) A fracture surface of the valve stem showing stained area and cup-and-cone shearing at perimeter. 0.7×. (b) Micrograph showing secondary intergranular cracks branching from fracture surface. 50× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 23 Two views of the fracture surface of a forged 17-4 PH stainless steel steam-turbine blade that failed by corrosion fatigue originating at severe corrosion pitting. (a) Light fractograph showing primary origin (arrow) and three secondary origins (along right edge below primary origin More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 31 Power plant gate-valve stem of 17-4 PH stainless that failed by SCC in high-purity water. (a) A fracture surface of the valve stem showing stained area and cup-and-cone shearing at perimeter. 0.7×. (b) Micrograph showing secondary intergranular cracks branching from fracture surface More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 10 Mass loss vs. number of compound impact cycles for 17-4 PH stainless steel counterfaces tested with CPM-10V steel specimens (impact stress 69 MPa). Source: Ref 26 More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 23 Two views of the fracture surface of a forged 17-4 PH stainless steel steam-turbine blade that failed by corrosion fatigue originating at severe corrosion pitting. (a) Light fractograph showing primary origin (arrow) and three secondary origins (along right edge below primary origin More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 40 Stress-corrosion cracking in a 17-4 PH stainless steel gate-valve stem that failed in high-purity water. (a) Photograph of the valve stem fracture surface showing stained area and cup-and-cone shearing at perimeter. (b) Micrograph showing secondary intergranular cracks branching from More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 12 Mass loss versus number of compound-impact cycles for 17-4 PH stainless steel counterfaces tested with CPM-10V steel specimens (impact stress: 69 MPa, or 10 ksi). Source: Ref 31 More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 4 Lack of fusion in 17-4 PH stainless steel processed by metal additive manufacturing More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 13 Images of 17-4 PH stainless steel. (a) Metal additive manufacturing process. (b) Wrought product. Original magnification of both: 200× More
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.design.c0047109
EISBN: 978-1-62708-233-4
... Abstract A series of poppet-valve stems fabricated from 17-4 PH (AISI type 630) stainless steel failed prematurely in service during the development of a large combustion assembly. The poppet valves were part of a scavenging system that evacuated the assembly after each combustion cycle...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.marine.c0047917
EISBN: 978-1-62708-227-3
... that the failure was caused by fatigue initiated in corrosion pits (caused by seawater). The fracture was found to be transgranular. It was recommended that the inner and outer rings should both be made from the more corrosion resistant 17-4 PH (AISI type 630) stainless steel. Cyclic load Hydrofoils Stress...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.mech.c0001667
EISBN: 978-1-62708-225-9
... with 17-4 PH stainless steel bolts (Condition H 1150M) having a hardness of 22 HRC. Bolts Chlorides Corrosion environment 4137 UNS G41370 Stress-corrosion cracking Hydrogen damage and embrittlement Figure 1 shows an example of hydrogen-assisted SCC failure of four AISI 4137 steel bolts...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.power.c0091640
EISBN: 978-1-62708-229-7
... Abstract A valve stem made of 17-4 PH (AISI type 630) stainless steel, which was used for operating a gate valve in a steam power plant, failed after approximately four months of service, during which it had been exposed to high-purity water at approximately 175 deg C (350 deg F) and 11 MPa...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.modes.c0046371
EISBN: 978-1-62708-234-1
... had not seized, and there was no evidence of heat discoloration in the galled areas. The inner cone, made of modified 4720 steel and carburized for wear resistance, rode on an AISI type 630 (17-4 PH) stainless steel spacer. Consequently, it was desirable to determine whether the galled spots contained...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1992
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v01.c9001026
EISBN: 978-1-62708-214-3
... Abstract Cracks were discovered in the cast 17-4 PH stainless steel outboard leading edge flap support of an aircraft wing during overhaul inspection. Failure analysis focused on an apparently intergranular area of fracture surface. It was determined that the original mode of crack growth...
Series: ASM Failure Analysis Case Histories
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.fach.v02.c9001361
EISBN: 978-1-62708-215-0
... Abstract A 17-4 PH steering actuator rod end body broke during normal take-off. Results of failure analysis revealed that the wall thickness of the race was much below the design limits, thus causing the race to rest on the body's swaged edges rather than on the load carrying centerline...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 43 Effect of Δ K on fatigue fracture mechanisms. (a) Alpha-beta titanium alloy. (b) EN-24 and 300 M steels. (c) 17-4 PH stainless steel. Source: Ref 31 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 11 Mass loss vs. sliding velocity for compound impact testing of titanium alloy RMI 5522S specimens against 17-4 PH stainless steel counterfaces (impact stress 18.6 MPa). Source: Ref 20 More