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This chapter explains why it is sometimes necessary to separate inelastic from elastic strains and how to do it using one of two methods. It first discusses the direct calculation of strain-range components from experimental data associated with large strains. It then explains how the method can be extended to the treatment of very low inelastic strains by adjusting tensile and compressive hold periods and continuous cycling frequencies. The chapter then begins the presentation of the second approach, called the total strain-range method, so named because it combines elastic and inelastic strain into a total strain range. The discussion...

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