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glass production

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Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1966) 15 (1): Fe-16.
Published: 01 January 1966
... NILO K has been developed specifically for the production of matched glass-to-metal seals when using hard, borosilicate glass. This datasheet provides information on composition, physical properties, hardness, and tensile properties. It also includes information on forming, heat treating...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1975) 24 (5): Pt-2.
Published: 01 May 1975
... crucibles and dishes. An exacting application is in the production of fibre glass which invloved the rapid flow of molten glass at temperatures of 1250-1350 C through a pierced plate which must retain its shape and alignment. This datasheet provides information on composition, physical properties...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1999) 48 (1): Fe-119.
Published: 01 January 1999
... SEALVAR is an iron-nickel-cobalt strip alloy primarily used for making hermetic seals with harder glasses and ceramics. It is distinguished by its high purity, closely controlled chemistry and very low carbon level. The alloy meets specified ASTM F 15-78 (83) expansion coefficients. This datasheet...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1999) 48 (2): Fe-120.
Published: 01 February 1999
.... Filing Code: FE-120. Producer or source: AMETEK Specialty Metal Products. Producer or Source: AMETEK Specialty Metal Products Copyright © ASM International® 1999 1999 ASM International AMETEK 936 AMETEK 942 AMETEK 946 AMETEK 948 AMETEK 952 chemical composition elasticity glasses...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1968) 17 (4): Ni-132.
Published: 01 April 1968
... Nickel 211 is a nickel-manganese alloy recommended for improved resistance to attack by sulfur compounds at elevated temperatures. It is recommended for supports scaled in glass, grid wires in electron tubes, spark plug electrodes, etc. This datasheet provides information on composition, physical...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1978) 27 (2): Bi-3.
Published: 01 February 1978
... BELMONT ALLOYS 2451 and 2491 are bismuth-base, eutectic, low-melting alloys that are used for tooling and production aids; 2451 melts at 117 F and 2491 at 136 F. They provide the engineer with easily castable material that is ready for use as soon as it freezes. The alloys can be recovered easily...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1990) 39 (7): CI-61.
Published: 01 July 1990
... on heat treating and machining. Filing Code: CI-61. Producer or source: Federal Bronze Products Inc.. Producer or Source: Federal Bronze Products Inc. Copyright © ASM International® 1996 1996 ASM International chemical composition DURA-BAR G1A GLASS MOLD IRON hardness heat treatability...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1982) 31 (8): Ni-278.
Published: 01 August 1982
... METGLAS MBF-60A is a brazing foil in ductile, flexible metallic-glass form (a similar grade, MBF-60, is identical except that it has larger dimensional tolerances). It is an excellent choice of filler metal for large production runs of low-to-medium stressed assemblies. Its excellent flow...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1979) 28 (12): Fe-60.
Published: 01 December 1979
... composition corrosion-resistant alloys elasticity glass products heat treatability joinability machinability physical properties relays TECHALLOY GLASSEAL 29-17 tensile properties thermal expansion transmitting tubes workability All OV TECHALLOY GLASSEAL 2947 Filing Code: Fe-60 iron Alloy...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1975) 24 (3): Co-41.
Published: 01 March 1975
... fracture toughness glass production hardness heat treatability joinability machinability metallurgical applications oxidation resistance physical properties slags tensile properties thermal resistance UMCo-50 workability I 1 Filing Code: Co-41 UMCO - 50 Cobalt Alloy RevisedMarch 1975...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1981) 30 (12): Ni-273.
Published: 01 December 1981
... lack the structural features common in crystalline metals. In the absence of crystaUinity, neither grams, grain boundaries, grain orienta- tions nor additional phases exist. The glassy state is essentially one phase, possessing complete chemical homogeneity. ProduCtion: To produce metallic glasses...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1984) 33 (6): Ni-298.
Published: 01 June 1984
... ofcrysrallinity. neither grams. gram boundaries. grain orientations nor additional phases exist. The glassy state IS essentially one phase. possessing complete chemical homogeneity. Heat Treatment: Production: METGLAS MBF-~OIMBF-90A is used in the as-cast condition which is an amorphous. opaque metallic-glass...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1984) 33 (12): Ni-306.
Published: 01 December 1984
.... The glassy state is essentially one phase. possessing complete chemical homogeneity. Production: To produce metallic glasses. such as METGLAS MBF-65 MBF- 65.4. Ihe liquid metal must be cooled rapidly enough to avoid sohdIlicaIlon by Ihe normal crystallization process and retain a IiquId-like structure in Ihe...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1983) 32 (1): Ni-282.
Published: 01 January 1983
... glasses also lack the structural features common in crystalline metals. In theabsenceof crystallinity, neither grains, grain boundaries. grain orientations nor additional phases exist. The glassy state is essentially one phase. possessing complete chemical homogeneity. Production: To produce metallic...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1987) 36 (6): Ni-349.
Published: 01 June 1987
... to avoid solid-state transformation. Fig. 1 - Thermogram of METGLAS MBF-50: MBF50A brazing foil obtained by using differential thermal analysis technique. Heating rate is 20°C per minute in argon atmosphere. Production: The minimum quench rate necessaryto produce metallic glasses in most glass-forming...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1984) 33 (4): Ni-296.
Published: 01 April 1984
... the structural features common in crystalline metals. In the absenceof crystallinity. neither grains. grain boundaries. grain orientations nor additional phases exist. The glassy state is essentially one phase. possessing complete chemical homogeneity. Production: To produce metallic glasses. such as METGLAS MBF...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1983) 32 (8): Ni-290.
Published: 01 August 1983
...) Knoop microhardness (IO&gram load and I Ssecond idcntation time) 155+11 Production: To produce metallic glasses, such as METGLAS MBF-80/80A. the liquid metal must be cooled rapidly enough to avoid solidification by the normal crystallization process and retain a liquid-like structure in the solid...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1983) 32 (5): Ni-286.
Published: 01 May 1983
... with a rapidly moving cylindrical chill block. In this manner, metallic glass ribbon can be produced at high linear speeds. Direct processing of metals from the liquid state to the finished size and shape offers several practical advantages over conventional methods of wire and ribbon production. The iterative...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1984) 33 (9): Ni-303.
Published: 01 September 1984
.... Production: To produce metallic glasses, such as METGLAS MBF-17/MBF- l7A. the liquid metal must be cooled rapidly enough to avoid solidification by the normal crystallization process and retain a liquid-like structure in the solid. Because atomic mobility in liquids is much greater than in the solid slate...
Journal Articles
Alloy Digest (1981) 30 (11): Ni-272.
Published: 01 November 1981
.... In this manner, metallic glass ribbon can be produced at high linear speeds. Direct processing of metals from the liquid state to the fii- ed size and shape offers several practical advantages over con- ventional methods of wire and ribbon production. The iterative, energy and time-consuming processes of rolling...